Monthly Archives: April 2014

How might we make possible what might have seemed unthinkable?

What will bring us together?
How can we – with others, especially others that look at things very differently – develop a shared preferred future?
What keeps us from working across differences toward the common good?
What happens when we do nothing at all to attempt to impact the status qou, even when we believe that the status quo is not serving the common good?
What stops us from embracing our dissimilarities and our similarities while tackling the challenges that are important to all of us as we move toward a shared preferred future?
How can we hear all voices and listen for and appreciate what is unique about the points of view of others?
How can we build trust and rapport across differences?
How can we get better at seeking to understand others and exploring possibilities where none existed before – rather than to win over others?
Note*
In his book: David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits and the Art of Battling Giants (2013) Malcom Gladwell explains that his major purposes for writing this book are connected what can happen when ordinary people (read you and me) confront giants. He sees two basic ways to frame these encounters with giants we all experience.
“The first is that much of what we consider valuable in our world arises out of these kinds of lopsided conflicts, because the act of facing overwhelming odds produces greatness and beauty. And second, that we consistently get these kinds of conflicts wrong. We misread them. We misinterpret them. Giants are not what we think they are. The same qualities that appear to give them strength are often the sources of great weakness. And the fact of being an underdog can change people in ways that we often fail to appreciate: it can open doors and create opportunities and educate and enlighten and make possible what might otherwise have seemed unthinkable.” (page 6)
Might the challenge of facing this ‘lopsided conflict’ the questions that opened this post focus on – be our “giants”? Might we embracing these questions and working through them be about ‘facing overwhelming odds’? And if so, might we ‘produce greatness’?
Might the confronting the shared work around the questions that opened this post uncover that the giants confronted are weaker than we thought? Might moving forward on the engagement and sorting out which will follow from the sincere connection to these questions potentially ‘open doors and create opportunities and educate and enlighten and make possible what might otherwise have seemed unthinkable?’

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*Some of these questions were influenced by Michael J. Marquardt’s work: Leading With Questions: How Leaders Find Right Solutions by Knowing What to Ask Revised and Updated (2014)

PERIODS OF CHAOS CAN BE EMBRACED AS A PORTAL TO CHANGE

As I read Roger Lewin’s and Birute Regine’s Weaving Complexity and Business: Engaging the Soul at Work (2000) I was impressed with their message regarding ‘complexity’. Yes, they write from a business perspective where managers are many and their roles are very important. And yes, some educators and educational leaders might not like to think of ‘businesses’ and ‘managers’ when they think about schooling.
Given that, please read the following quote from their book. “When managers accept that periods of chaos are natural – even desirable – in business, then they will come to see chaos with different eyes. Specifically, periods of chaos can be embraced as a portal to change, which may be enhanced through respectful and limited influence, not as an aberration that needs to be avoided.”
Most of us would likely agree that education is going through a time of dramatic change. And that the concepts of maintaining the status quo or going back to the specific order of less chaotic times are not reasonable.  So, the times we live in, raise our families in, help with our grandchildren in and work in are changing.
These times may lead to a better and different future. Maybe our influence on the future may be limited yet respecting the fact that change is here and is continuing to unfold – we need to be part of the ‘unfolding’.
Our vision has to be on the future and not on the past. Helping to shape tomorrow for our children and grandchildren is important work. To do that we need to be clear on our vision of all children benefiting from schooling and all children being effectively launched as citizens of tomorrow. IMG_6481